Research on the Effects of Media

© 2008-2011 Douglas A. Gentile; All Rights Reserved

Douglas A. Gentile, Ph.D.

Media Research Measures

It is the responsibility of scientists to share their research so that others may attempt to replicate their findings. Here are some of the measures that I use in my studies.


General Media Habits Questionnaire - Child Version (GMHQ-C)

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This version of the survey measures media violence exposure (TV, video games, movies), prosocial media exposure (TV, video games, movies), relationally aggressive media exposure (TV, video games, movies), preference for violence in games, total weekly screen time (TV & video games), parental involvement in media (very basic - see Adult Involvement in Media scale for more detailed version), TV in the bedroom, physical fights, and basic demographics. This version has been used successfully as young as third grade.

General Media Habits Questionnaire - Adult Version (GMHQ-A)

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This version of the survey measures media violence exposure (TV, video games, movies), prosocial media exposure (TV, video games, movies), relationally aggressive media exposure (TV, video games, movies), preference for violence in games, total weekly screen time (TV & video games), pathological video gaming (short version), third-person effect, grades (for secondary or college students), physical fights, and basic demographics.  This version is appropriate for secondary school children through adults.

Adult Involvement in Media scale  - Child Version (AIM-C)

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This version of the survey measures children’s perceptions of how involved their parents are in their media habits.  It specifically focuses on TV and video games separately, asking about four aspects of parental monitoring: co-viewing, limit setting on amount, limit setting on content, and active mediation.

Adult Involvement in Media scale  - Parent Version (AIM-P)

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This version of the survey measures children’s perceptions of how involved their parents are in their media habits.  It specifically focuses on TV and video games separately, asking about four aspects of parental monitoring: co-viewing, limit setting on amount, limit setting on content, and active mediation.  Additionally, it gathers information on family use of media, parental consistency, bedroom media, and demographics.